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- Jun 29, 2021

Listen to Jason Vaaler, Money Education Advisor talk about student loans, what to expect as an incoming freshman. He will discuss in detail the difference in federal and private loans, terminology a student should be acquainted and how to apply for them. Listen to him answer questions/doubts and concerns most freshmen have when it comes to debt, and how to lower your debt, and how to repay it back efficiently.





- Jun 03, 2021

All Texans deserve access to affordable, high-quality learning opportunities that lead to credentials of value—postsecondary credentials that will unlock their potential, help them provide for their families, and pursue their dreams. Helping students understand the financial choices they will make before, during and after their postsecondary education and giving them the tools they need to achieve financial wellness is critical to students’ long-term success. This report from the Financial Wellness Learning Collaborative, a group of higher education professionals from across our great state, builds on the recommendations of the Financial Literacy Advisory Committee and the innovative efforts of higher education leaders in Texas and nationwide.

View the full report.





- Feb 26, 2021

Because income may be limited for students, what strategies can teens and young adults use to save money on recurring expenses like car insurance?

When it comes to anything regarding personal finances, my moto has always been “control what you can control.” As a young college student, you already have certain underlying factors that make you a higher risk for car insurance companies.

View the full article, Expert Advice: Car Insurance for College and High School Students.







- Sep 04, 2018

The idea that your morning coffee - or avocado toast - purchase is what's preventing you from becoming a millionaire is a personal finance "truthism" that's existed for decades. And, yes, while opting to brew weekday coffee at home could save you $1,000 per year, there are other ways to adjust your spending that make a bigger impact. 

Read on for other ways to build your budget while still being able to splurge on the luxuries that bring you joy.

To view the full article, visit https://money.usnews.com/money/personal-finance/saving-and-budgeting/slideshows/10-big-ways-to-boost-your-budget-without-skimping-on-your-daily-latte







- Apr 30, 2018

“What is a mutual fund?” Sam Rogers asked his financial literacy class.

Tessa Sabin, an 11th grader at Riverton High School, offered a guess: “Isn’t it where you invest in something that’s invested in multiple things? So that if one of them tanks, it doesn’t affect you overall because your investment is spread around.”

Rogers throws a lollipop to her for answering correctly. This kind of question is normal in Utah high schools, where financial literacy is a core requirement to graduate. Five states in the U.S. earn an A grade from Champlain College’s Center for Financial Literacy when it comes to teaching personal finance in high school, but only Utah has gotten an A+.

To view the full article, visit https://finance.yahoo.com/news/one-state-gets-teaching-students-money-161046576.html.



- Apr 24, 2018

April is Financial Literacy Month, and whether you're a money guru or just someone who wants to know more, you can get involved.

Financial knowledge is important. Just 57 percent of American adults are financially literate, according to the 2015 S&P Global Financial Literacy Survey. That ranks 14th in the world – far behind such nations as Denmark (71 percent), Canada (68 percent), Israel (68 percent), Germany (66 percent) and Australia (64 percent). Clearly, Americans can do better, and we should.

How can you help? Here are a few ways you can make a difference during Financial Literacy Month.

To view the full article, visit https://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/my-money/articles/2017-04-10/3-ways-to-take-action-during-financial-literacy-month



- Apr 16, 2018

Millennials have to endure many stereotypes. They are often labeled lazy, entitled and even narcissistic.

Zach Swartz, an older millennial himself and portfolio manager with BKD Wealth Advisors in Springfield, Missouri, isn't sure the generation really deserves to be singled out in that way. "Sometimes millennials can be painted as very different from other generations when they're not," he says.

Case in point: the money management mistakes commonly made by millennials. The following six mistakes aren't so different from the financial gaffes made by older adults.

To view the full article, visit https://money.usnews.com/money/personal-finance/family-finance/articles/2018-03-02/6-money-management-mistakes-millennials-often-make



- Apr 09, 2018

April is Financial Literacy Month. You might suspect there is a problem with financial literacy in America, if an entire month is dedicated to it! And you would be right.

April is an opportune time to look at three efforts that may have a chance to combat financial illiteracy. These are chosen because of their scalability and capacity to make a real difference for financial literacy in America.

To view the full article, visit https://www.forbes.com/sites/pensionresearchcouncil/2016/04/01/happy-financial-literacy-month/#4015505fe213



- Apr 09, 2018

Students preparing to begin college and take more control over their personal finances in many cases lack the skills and knowledge to make responsible financial decisions and repay their student loans, according to a new survey from EverFi.

The survey collected data from a nationally representative sample of more than 100,000 incoming college students — most from four-year institutions — in more than 410 institutions across the country. Overall, the survey found that most respondents struggled to answer basic financial literacy questions, and on average only answered two of six questions correctly.

To view the full article, visit https://www.nasfaa.org/news-item/14855/Survey_Incoming_College_Students_Struggle_With_Basic_Financial_Literacy.



- Apr 02, 2018

It’s truly an honor to stand by your friend’s side as she exchanges vows with her beloved and takes her first steps toward marital bliss. If only those precious moments could make up for the exorbitant costs that come with being a part of her special day.

Members of the wedding party spend an average of $728 on gifts, travel and attire for the wedding, bachelor or bachelorette party and shower, according to a new Bankrate report.

The average price varies depending on where you live. Northeastern wedding party members should be prepared to shell out even more than that, with an average all-in cost of $1,070 to participate in all three events.

While those figures may be eye-boggling, it’s actually an extremely conservative estimate.

To view the full article, visit https://finance.yahoo.com/news/much-americans-spend-attend-wedding-100053961.html.



- Mar 27, 2018

The arrival of spring often motivates people to stop hibernating and renew healthier habits, such as enjoying more outdoor activity and adopting a better overall diet. If you're hoping to add some more wholesome and healthy ingredients to your cooking, there are a number of inexpensive, everyday items that pack a powerful, nutrient-rich punch. March is National Nutrition Month, so what better time is there to try these healthy and cheap ingredients in your next recipe?

Read on for five inexpensive and healthy ingredients to add to your meals.

To view the full article, visit https://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/my-money/articles/2018-03-22/try-these-nutritious-and-cheap-ingredients-in-your-next-recipe.



- Mar 19, 2018

Managing your money during a semester abroad is no easy feat.

After a summer internship at CNBC writing about personal finance, I left for a semester abroad armed with plenty of information to better manage my money. But now that I've been in Spain for a few months, I've found there's a lot I didn't know.

Here are six key lessons I've learned about how to manage money while studying abroad.

To view the full article, visit https://www.cnbc.com/2017/10/09/6-tricks-to-spend-wisely-during-a-semester-abroad.html.



- Feb 26, 2018

Imagine that your roof starts to leak. Or your car breaks down. Or, worst of all, a pink slip lands on your desk.

The credit cards in your wallet could likely keep you dry, on the road, and well fed, but running up significant debt can cause a major setback to your financial plan. That’s why you always need to have ready access to a chuck of cash—that is, an emergency fund—that allows your financial life to stay on track even if you encounter a significant, unexpected expense.

To view full article, visit time.com/money/collection-post/2791948/emergency-fund-how-much-money/



- Feb 19, 2018

Bad credit is not a life sentence, which is good news for the roughly one-third of people with credit scores below 620. So if your credit is damaged, there are indeed steps that you can take to rebuild. After all, rebuilding credit is a process that takes time and requires focus on the fundamentals. And we’ll explain exactly what you need to do below.

What you don’t want to do, however, is pay for credit repair. Anyone who claims the ability to “fix” or “clean up” your credit for a fee is scamming you. There is nothing any purported credit “repair” service can do that you cannot do yourself for free.

We made the following tips as practical as possible to give you both the structure of a plan and a clue about how to actually stick to it. Knowing what to do and actually doing it are two very different things, after all. We also explored how long the hands of time will have to turn before you can put bad credit behind you, hopefully once and for all.

Here’s what you need to do to rebuild your credit.

To view the full article, visit https://wallethub.com/edu/rebuild-credit/19613/#david-roach.



- Feb 15, 2018

As national student poverty rises, Texas A&M resource facilities are taking action to assist Aggies with financial and nutritional aid.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 34.7 percent of College Station’s population is living below the poverty line, with the highest number of people falling between the ages of 18 and 24. The issue of college poverty is more concentrated at A&M, according to Megan Ford, kinesiology junior and executive director of The 12th Can.

“We’re above the state and national average for poverty, so one in five people in this area are food insecure, which is actually higher than most universities,” Ford said.

To view the full article, visit http://www.thebatt.com/news/battling-college-poverty-at-texas-a-m/article_7d2b8406-105f-11e8-82e0-73813b656c1a.html.



- Feb 12, 2018

Watch any romantic comedy and you’ll see the leading couple put a lot of effort into impressing each other over the course of the movie. For example, he might take ballroom dancing lessons behind her back—and just when she’s about to confront him at his niece’s wedding reception, he holds out his hand and wows the room. Those small acts work almost every time! That’s because sincere effort goes a long way in getting—and keeping—the guy or girl.

Want to bring Hollywood home? Plan a monthly budget with your spouse. Wait! We’re serious. Guys, get ready to win the heart of your girl all over again. And ladies, your man won’t know what hit him. Having and sticking to a budget will help you be a better spouse. Here’s why:

To view the full article, visit https://www.everydollar.com/blog/ways-budgeting-makes-you-a-better-spouse



- Jan 30, 2018

Another new year, another chance for well-intentioned resolutions to start with a bang and fizzle out. But unlike failing to drop those last five pounds, falling short on financial goals you’re banking on in 2018 could cost you for years to come.

Generally, attainable goals follow the SMART approach: They’re specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time-based. But that doesn’t mean attainable goals are all easy. A recent study indicates certain money goals that fit these criteria can remain challenging for some who are striving toward them.

Here are some 2017 financial resolutions that proved hardest to hit, with reported achievement rates, according to the 2018 New Year Money Report.

To view the full article, visit https://www.nerdwallet.com/article/money-goals





- Jan 17, 2018

2018 is fast approaching, providing the perfect opportunity to hit the “reset” button on your budget, particularly if you’ve faced unexpected financial problems this past year. Getting back on track can feel like an overwhelming task, but it doesn’t have to be. Better Money Habits outlines six simple steps to follow on the road towards regaining control over your finances.

To view the full article, visit https://americasaves.org/blog/1542-new-year-new-you-and-a-renewed-budget